Carole Pateman Prize

Carole Pateman Gender and Politics Book Prize

The biennial Carole Pateman Book Prize is due to be awarded in 2017.

This prize is for the best book published in the specified eligibility period on the topic of gender and politics, broadly defined.

Criteria on which entries will be judged

  1. Significance of contribution to gender and politics research through effective incorporation of gender or feminist perspectives into political science.
  2. Excellence in writing and communication.
  3. Scholarly innovation and rigor.

Conditions of entry

  1. The author may of any gender identification, but must be a member of APSA (if the book has multiple authors, one of the authors must be an APSA member);
  2. The monograph may be single- or jointly-authored, however edited books are not eligible.
  3. The book must have been published by a university or commercial publisher in the preceding two years. For the 2017 Prize, this means a publication date of 2015 or 2016.
  4. A book may only be submitted once for the prize.
  5. Authors can self-nominate or be nominated by another person.
  6. APSA reserves the right not to award the prize in any given year.

The APSA Women’s Caucus Executive will chair the judging panel (or a delegate if there is a conflict of interest), and the panel will consist of two other gender and politics experts, including if possible a former Carole Pateman book prize winner. 

Submission Guidelines

A digital copy - ebook, PDF, download link(s) - of the eligible book should be emailed to the APSA Executive Assistant by Monday 19 June, 2017.  

If a digital copy is not possible, please contact the APSA Executive Assistant as soon as possible to make alternate arrangements. 

The APSA Executive Assistant will advise the winner in sufficient time to ensure the winner’s presence, if possible, at the annual APSA Conference dinner, where the prize of $500 and a trophy will be awarded.

 

Past Carole Pateman Prize Winners

2015: Jacqui True, Monash University, The Political Economy of Violence Against Women